MD Course Descriptions | NYU Long Island School of Medicine | NYU Langone Health

Skip to Main Content
MD Curriculum MD Course Descriptions

MD Course Descriptions

At NYU Long Island School of Medicine, we offer various courses, clerkships, and learning experiences to complete your medical degree, helping you become a leader in primary care medicine.

Longitudinal Courses

Longitudinal learning courses take place throughout all phases of our curriculum and are integrated with our basic and clinical science courses and clerkships.

Practice of Medicine

Throughout phase one of our curriculum, students take Practice of Medicine (POM), a longitudinal learning experience that runs concurrently with the Language Acquisition course and organ systems courses. POM bridges the foundational and clinical sciences with bedside and simulation-based teaching techniques.

Students develop core clinical skills that include the following:

  • patient-centered, culturally competent medical interviewing and communication techniques
  • verbal and written documentation of patient histories and physical examinations
  • clinical reasoning to formulate differential diagnoses

You apply the information you learn in foundational science sessions each morning to clinical cases you encounter each afternoon during group didactic learning sessions, self-study, and bedside training sessions.

You gain clinical exposure to real patients twice monthly, in one-on-one sessions with faculty members. You also receive robust mentoring during small group sessions with your peers throughout your first year.

Upon completing POM, students are well versed in how to conduct in-depth medical interviews and physical examinations, develop differential diagnoses, and order the appropriate diagnostic tests.

For more information about POM, contact Ralph K. Della Ratta, MD, course director, at ralph.dellaratta@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2494.

Health Systems Science

During the Health Systems Science longitudinal course, you build foundational knowledge in six core health systems science domains: healthcare structure and processes; healthcare policy, economics, and management; population and public health; epidemiology and biostatistics; value-based care; and health system improvement and patient safety.

These learning experiences highlight how health systems influence patient care and incorporate principles of leadership, teamwork, professionalism, ethics, and evidence-based practice throughout our broader medical school curriculum.

Continuity Ambulatory Practice Experience

All students complete objective structured clinical examinations at NYU Winthrop Hospital’s Simulation Center and a Continuity Ambulatory Practice Experience, also known as CAPE, twice a month.

For the first six months of CAPE, students are assigned to a sequence of three different ambulatory experiences that include internal medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, geriatrics, and general surgery. CAPE takes place twice a month, and you rotate through each ambulatory experience every two months.

After that first six months, you select one discipline to continue with for the rest of medical school, at which point CAPE takes place once a month.

Learning Community

During the Learning Community longitudinal course, students learn about forming a professional identity and developing ethics and professionalism, along with further exploration of the medical humanities and social sciences. This course spans all three years of medical school.

You develop the skills needed to engage in self reflection, moral reasoning, and ethical analysis and prepare to capably negotiate the complexities of clinical care and medicine in society.

Each two-hour Learning Community session is divided between a structured small group reflective discourse centered on particular topics and skills and semi-structured peer-to-peer and faculty-to-peer support and mentoring.

Preclerkship Courses

Preclerkship courses provide comprehensive introductions to physiology, embryology, histology, and anatomy, as well as pathophysiology, pathology, and pharmacology. Our courses weave key basic science concepts into clinical case studies and teach students how to diagnose diseases and treat patients in the neonatal, pediatric, adolescent, adult, geriatric, and end-of-life stages. All courses consist of case-based activities supplemented with small and large group sessions to encourage active learning.

Bill Miyawaki, MD, is the director of organ system modules for all courses. For more information about organ system modules, contact him at nobuyuki.miyawaki@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2171.

Language Acquisition

The Language Acquisition course integrates core concepts in molecular biology, genetics, biochemistry, cell biology, pathology, pathophysiology, microbiology, immunology, and pharmacology. All students must master this eight-week overview of basic science material before advancing to organ system courses.

For more information, contact Louis Ragolia, PhD, course director, at louis.ragolia@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2028.

Cardiology System

This four-week course provides an introduction to the cardiovascular system. Topics covered include normal cardiovascular physiology, heart failure, hypertension, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, bacterial endocarditis, heart murmurs, heart valve disease, hyperlipidemia, preventive cardiology, and electrocardiogram.

Each morning from 8:00AM to 12:00PM, you take part in seminars that further integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions that focus on anatomy, histology, pathology, and radiology take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize cardiovascular conditions. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examination for patients with cardiovascular conditions.

To learn more, contact Kevin P. Marzo, MD, course director, at kevin.marzo@nyulangone.org or 516-663-4480.

Pulmonary System

This four-week course provides an introduction to the pulmonary system. Key topics include pulmonary physiology, acute respiratory distress syndrome, asthma, bronchiolitis, chronic dyspnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, pulmonary hypertension, and tuberculosis.

Daily sessions take place from 8:00AM to 12:00PM. Learning activities integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which cover anatomy, histology, pathology, and radiology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize treatment and management of chronic and acute asthma. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examination for patients who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

To learn more, contact Mangalore Amith Shenoy, MD, or Shilpa A. DeSouza, MD, course co-directors, at mangalore.shenoy@nyulangone.org or shilpa.desouza@nyulangone.org or 516-663-3897.

Renal System

This three-week course provides an introduction to the renal system. Topics covered include normal renal physiology, acid–base balance, electrolyte imbalance, and kidney diseases.

Daily sessions from 8:00AM to 12:00PM integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which focus on anatomy, pathology, and radiology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs emphasize the impact of kidney disease on medical care. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examination for patients who have kidney disease.

For more information, contact Bill Miyawaki, MD, course co-director, at nobuyuki.miyawaki@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2171; or Manju M. Chandra, MD, course co-director, at manju.chandra@nyulangone.org or 516-663-9611.

Gastrointestinal System

This four-week course introduces students to the gastrointestinal system. Topics covered include congenital multi-organ motility disorder, Crohn’s disease, acute biliary pancreatitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, colon cancer, gastrointestinal complications in immunocompromised patients, abnormal results on liver-related tests, jaundice, and chronic liver disease.

Daily morning sessions from 8:00AM to 12:00PM integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which focus on anatomy, histology, and pathology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize treatment and management of gastrointestinal disease. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examination for patients with liver diseases.

For more information, contact Raluca Vrabie, MD, course director, at raluca.vrabie@nyulangone.org or 516-663-6905.

Endocrine–Reproductive System

This five-week course provides an introduction to the endocrine–reproductive system. Topics covered include normal endocrine and reproductive systems, diabetes, acute hyperglycemia, thyroid disease, growth disorders, breast lumps, postpartum depression, and sexually transmitted infections.

Daily morning sessions from 8:00AM to 12:00PM integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which focus on anatomy, histology, and pathology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize treatments for diabetes and reproductive issues. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examinations for patients who have endocrine issues.

For more information, contact Stanislaw Klek, MD, course co-director, at stan.klek@nyulangone.org or 516-663-1654; or Wendy L. Kinzler, MD, course co-director, at wendy.kinzler@nyulangone.org.

Musculoskeletal, Rheumatology, and Dermatology Multisystem

This five-week course provides an introduction to the musculoskeletal, rheumatology, allergy, and dermatology systems. Topics covered include medication allergies, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, sacroiliitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis.

Daily morning sessions from 8:00AM to 12:00PM integrate concepts from disciplines that include infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which focus on anatomy, histology, and pathology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize treatments for dermatological and other vasculitis disorders. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examinations for patients who have musculoskeletal issues.

For more information, contact Elise Belilos, MD, rheumatology course director, at elise.belilos@nyulangone.org or 516-663-4755; or James D. Capozzi, MD, musculoskeletal course director, at james.capozzi@nyulangone.org or 516-663-4798.

Brain, Mind, and Behavior

This six-week course provides a comprehensive introduction to the neuroscience and behavioral systems. Topics include the normal neurobehavioral system, acute ischemic stroke, panic disorder, seizures and migraines, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, opioid use disorder, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and sleep disorders in patients who have Parkinson’s disease.

Daily morning sessions from 8:00AM to 12:00PM integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which focus on anatomy, histology, and pathology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize recognizing and treating neurological and behavioral conditions. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examination for patients who have neurological illnesses.

For more information, contact Shazia A. Alam, MD, course director, at at shazia.alam@nyulangone.org or 516-663-4525.

Hematology–Oncology System

This two-week course provides an introduction to the hematology–oncology system. Topics covered include the hematological system, anemia, oncology, and thrombocytopenia.

Daily morning sessions from 8:00AM to 12:00PM integrate concepts from disciplines including infectious disease, pharmacology, genetics, and embryology. Morphology of Medicine laboratory sessions, which focus on anatomy, histology, pathology, and radiology, take place on Monday and Thursday mornings.

CAPEs and POM emphasize hematological issues. Patient encounters and bedside teaching experiences focus on history taking and physical examination for patients with hematological and oncological conditions.

To learn more, contact Marc J. Braunstein, MD, PhD, course co-director, at marc.braunstein@nyulangone.org or 516-663-9500; Jaime A. Suarez-Londono, MD, course co-director, at jaime.suarezlondono@nyulangone.org or 516-663-9500; or Chana Glasser, MD, course co-director, at chana.glasser@nyulangone.org or 516-663-9760.

Morphology of Medicine: Anatomy, Histology, Pathology, and Radiology

This longitudinally integrated educational thread, also called M4, provides foundational knowledge of the four morphological sciences: anatomy, histology, pathology, and radiology. This module takes place over the course of 38 learning sessions that occur within the organ systems and language acquisition courses during phase one of our curriculum.

Studying the morphology of medicine is similar to acquiring a new language—students literally learn thousands of new words throughout the course. Instructors use both regional and systemic approaches to teach the structures of anatomy and their relationships to one another and to describe the major systems of the body. Success comes from understanding medical terminology, visualizing the structures of disease three dimensionally, and applying this knowledge to solve clinical problems.

Students participate in M4 laboratories with collaborative and integrative instruction from pathologists, anatomists, and radiologist. Through active learning approaches, students gain exposure to human anatomy and pathology from plastinated anatomy models, articulated and disarticulated skeletal models, surgical and autopsy specimens, and by performing autopsies.

For more information, contact Amy V. Rapkiewicz, MD, course director, at amy.rapkiewicz@nyulangone.org; Brian M. Shearer, MD, course faculty, at brian.shearer@nyulangone.org; or Jeffrey B. Alpert, MD, course faculty, at jeffrey.alpert@nyulangone.org.

Clerkships

During phases two and three of the NYU Long Island School of Medicine curriculum, students participate in clerkships. Our clerkships are competency based and follow Core Entrustable Professional Activities, or Core EPAs, guidelines from the Association of American Medical Colleges, which establish expectations for activities that all medical students should be able to perform upon entering residency.

We offer the following clerkships:

Emergency Medicine Clerkship

During this four-week, phase three rotation at NYU Winthrop Hospital, students gain a comprehensive introduction to adult and pediatric emergency medicine from a variety of faculty, preceptors, and emergency department staff. Clinical experiences include managing patients in the emergency department, performing common emergent procedures, attending didactic lectures, and completing simulation experiences.

You participate in the stabilization and resuscitation of patients, take medical histories, perform physical examinations, become familiar with emergency department admission and discharge processes, and gain understanding of the role of prehospital and emergency department care in the continuum of care.

If you have questions about the Emergency Medicine Clerkship, contact Rita Francique, clerkship coordinator, at rita.francique@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2496; Sunil George, MD, clerkship co-director, at sunil.george@nyulangone.org; or Suchismita Datta, MD, clerkship co-director, at suchismita.datta@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2727.

Pediatric Clerkship

This six-week, phase two rotation takes place at NYU Winthrop Hospital Children’s Medical Center. Students get a comprehensive introduction to general pediatric medicine that includes treating newborns through adolescents.

Didactic lectures, small group learning, conferences, and observed, structured clinical examinations and simulations are part of the educational experience. Each student is assigned to a faculty preceptor, who you meet on a weekly basis, and a teaching resident during your inpatient unit rotation, who you meet with monthly.

Students practice taking comprehensive medical histories and performing physical examinations. You also become familiar with common pediatric procedures and maintain patient medical records. Our curriculum is based on recommendations put forth by the Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics (COMSEP).

If you have questions about the Pediatric Clerkship, contact Tina Jones, clerkship coordinator, at tina.jones@nyulangone.org or 516-663-4423; Arsenia M. Asuncion, MD, clerkship co-director, at arsenia.asuncion@nyulangone.org; or Manju M. Chandra, MD, clerkship co-director, at manju.chandra@nyulangone.org.

Internal Medicine Clerkship

During this eight-week, phase two rotation, students gain experience caring for adult patients at NYU Winthrop Hospital and participate in educational sessions about internal medicine topics. You work closely with a team of inpatient house staff and an attending preceptor, participate in floor activities, and are required to attend all didactic learning courses.

In addition to the didactic sessions, you participate in simulated learning focused on evaluating patients with cardiac complaints, sepsis, and pneumonia. Your clinical experiences include rotating on the palliative care and geriatrics services, as well as on the medical intensive care unit.

If you have questions about the Internal Medicine Clerkship, contact Lily Gonzalez, clerkship coordinator, at lily.gonzalez@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2494; or Jamie C. Yedowitz-Freeman, MD, clerkship director, at jaime.yedowitz-freeman@nyulangone.org.

Primary Care Clerkship

This four-week, phase two clinical rotation takes place at NYU Winthrop Hospital’s ambulatory primary care sites. Students provide acute care, manage chronic conditions, engage in preventive care visits, and gain a better understanding of the physician–patient relationship in outpatient settings under the guidance of an attending preceptor.

During the rotation, you encounter patients with a range of common primary care complaints, formulate comprehensive patient histories, perform relevant physical exams, and develop appropriate patient assessment and management plans. Structured didactic learning sessions, home visits in hospice care settings, and physical therapy are also part of the clinical experience.

If you have questions about the Primary Care Clerkship, contact Shelly Nankishore, program coordinator, at shelly.nankishore@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2289; Niti Rajpal, MD, clerkship co-director, at niti.rajpal@nyulangone.org; or Joel A. Attard, DO, clerkship co-director, at joel.attard@nyulangone.org.

Neurology Clerkship

During this four-week, phase two clerkship, students learn the underlying principles and skills necessary to recognize and manage common neurologic diseases.

You take neurologic histories, perform patient examinations, and become familiar with basic disease processes. You also learn about the psychosocial impact of chronic and acute neurologic disease on patients and their families.

If you have questions about the Neurology Clerkship, contact Ashley Kirk, clerkship coordinator, at ashley.kirk@nyulangone.org or 516-663-4771; Shazia A. Alam, MD, clerkship co-director, at shazia.alam@nyulangone.org; or Jules V. Osias, MD, clerkship co-director, at jules.osias@nyulangone.org.

Psychiatry Clerkship

During this six-week, phase two clinical clerkship, students gain a range of clinical experience treating common psychiatric and substance use–related disorders in hospital- and office-based outpatient settings.

You accompany attending psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, and/or clinical social workers on patient assessments and visits, and you are actively encouraged to participate in each encounter. After you conduct your first few patient assessments under the observation of an attending, you are permitted to perform supervised patient evaluations.

If you have questions about the Psychiatry Clerkship, contact Stephanie Sanchez-Riffle, department secretary, at stephanie.sanchez-riffle@nyulangone.org or 516-663-2691; or Chris A. Karampahtsis, MD, clerkship director, at chris.karampahtsis@nyulangone.org.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship

This six-week, phase two clinical rotation exposes students to the breadth and depth of obstetrics and gynecology services at a major academic medical center. In addition to clinical experience, students participate in didactic learning sessions that include lectures, clinical skills workshops, and seminars.

During your clerkship, you work closely with residents, fellows, house staff, and faculty members, many of whom are experts in their field, to provide care to patients in our labor and delivery suite, operating rooms, ambulatory clinics, and inpatient hospital services.

All inpatient experiences take place at NYU Winthrop Hospital. Outpatient clinical experiences take place within NYU Winthrop Hospital’s ambulatory offices for general obstetrics and gynecology, maternal–fetal medicine, urogynecology, reproductive endocrinology, and gynecologic oncology.

If you have questions about the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship, contact Lisette Cardenas, clerkship coordinator, at lisette.cardenas@nyulangone.org or 516-663-8861; Nadia B. Kunzier, DO, clerkship co-director, at nadia.kunzier@nyulangone.org; or Nicole S. John, MD, clerkship co-director, at nicole.john@nyulangone.org.

Surgery Clerkship

This six-week, phase two clerkship provides broad clinical experience in general surgery. During the first three weeks, students assess and evaluate patients, participate in delivering surgical care, and provide postoperative care with a team of residents and attending physicians on the general surgical service. The remainder of your time is split among subspecialty surgical disciplines.

Our curriculum is based on recommendations from the Curriculum Committee of the Association for Surgical Education. If you have questions about the Surgery Clerkship, contact Stuart Bohrer, MD, clerkship director, at stuart.bohrer@nyulangone.org or 516-663-8700.